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Fifties christmas songs

The decade itself is so strongly associated with family gatherings and holiday traditions, certain things that transport us back there just have a way of creating a special warmth. To this day, they have an enduring appeal and iconic status. Some have multiple versions, of course, but each is a beloved, famous tune from the decade; any version you dig up online, on iTunes, on Spotify, or elsewhere will do. Article Feature Image Usage Information. Love the culture of the mid-century years? So do we! Don't miss any of our original content devoted to it! Subscribe to receive it all in a convenient monthly email. By Leonard Riforgiato. Leonard Riforgiato is a successful furniture manufacturing entrepreneur, a Miami resident, and co-owner of legacy furniture company Heywood-Wakefield.
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The Christmas oldies listed below cover all the major pop genres i. Debut years as obtained from Billboard chart and other data are shown below. For each song, the debut year usually corresponds to when it was first heard on the radio, typically around late November to early December of that year. Many Christmas oldies charted more than once, the most notable example being the perennial "White Christmas" by Bing Crosby. Disclosure: This page includes links that will take you to various online merchants outside of allbutforgottenoldies. Please note that these are referral or affiliate links from which allbutforgottenoldies. Oldies Christmas Songs The Christmas oldies listed below cover all the major pop genres i. Let It Snow! This later version is the one that was heard on the radio throughout most of the late s through mid s. Recharted several times in the s.
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Popular Christmas songs, like advertising, are one of the clearest windows into the American psyche. We can too. Indeed, virtually none of the holiday tunes written from the s through the s, which make up the bulk of the American Christmas playlist, include even a passing reference to Jesus or Christianity. The playlist tells us, despite the pervasiveness of a sort of genericized Christian theism in the post-war era, that true faith and devotion did not intrude very far into the Christian holiday turned commercial extravaganza. But to see only hedonistic consumerism would be to miss a lot. He was not viewed as a self-hating Italian, or as perpetuating harmful stereotypes, but rather as producing humorous and gentle self-parody and signifying, through his commercial success, that Italians had become part of the American family. It is ironic that even though advertising was more in your face in the s, and the overall atmosphere less individualistic and more conformist, there was still room for this kind of local, distributed, regionally diverse culture. Americans in different places truly listened to different music, ate different foods, and shopped at different stores. To some extent we still do, but it is often with hipster intentionality, having lost its everyday unselfconsciousness. The economic arrangements and built environments of suburbia, consumerism, monopolistic big-box stores, and online retail—some of which did not exist and the rest of which were in their infancy—had not yet flattened out that localism and diversity.

Popular Christmas songs, like advertising, are one of the clearest windows into the American psyche. We can too. Indeed, virtually none of the holiday tunes written from the s through the s, which make up the bulk of the American Christmas playlist, include even a passing reference to Jesus or Christianity.

The playlist tells us, despite the pervasiveness of a sort of genericized Christian theism in the post-war era, that true faith and devotion did not intrude very far into the Christian holiday turned commercial extravaganza. But to see only hedonistic consumerism would be to miss a lot. He was not viewed as a self-hating Italian, or as perpetuating harmful stereotypes, but rather as producing humorous and gentle self-parody and signifying, through his commercial success, that Italians had become part of the American family.

It is ironic that even though advertising was more in your face in the s, and the overall atmosphere less individualistic and more conformist, there was still room for this kind of local, distributed, regionally diverse culture. Americans in different places truly listened to different music, ate different foods, and shopped at different stores. To some extent we still do, but it is often with hipster intentionality, having lost its everyday unselfconsciousness.

The economic arrangements and built environments of suburbia, consumerism, monopolistic big-box stores, and online retail—some of which did not exist and the rest of which were in their infancy—had not yet flattened out that localism and diversity. Ironically, the New York region caused some of that flattening out: it was largely the coincidence of New York City being both a powerhouse of cultural production and a snowy northern metropolis that led to the inseparability of winter and Christmas in American popular culture.

The point is not that we can or should go back in time. Yuval Levin, in The Fractured Republic , notes that the era was uniquely transitional, a brief and necessarily temporary time when traditionalism and postwar modernity constructively coexisted. Many Christmas songs reflect that, combining domesticity and consumerism with an overlay of holiday cheer. Consider the social and economic information embedded in many of them.

Consider that no Christmas song describes holiday cheer taking place in a recognizably suburban, rather than urban or small-town, setting. Of course, they are not literally about those things. But they would not exist, or at least not make much sense, without the context in which they were written, which was very much about those things.

Rudolph, spanning the three mediums of print, vinyl, and screen in 25 years, is one of the first examples of a merchandising and entertainment franchise. They sound masculine, almost fatherly, without faux-machismo swagger or slick metrosexuality. You can almost imagine that there is a whole vanished civilization in those voices.

Nobody really sings this way now except occasionally in imitation; one wonders whether human vocal chords themselves have changed in 60 years. How much of the human voice is socially constructed? Perhaps there is simply no point in trying to top this:. If you will listen closely…you will discern the basest appeal to sex emotion in the young.

Can you imagine such a world? Maybe not, but plenty of people alive today grew up in it. For better or worse, this is ours. So pour some eggnog, turn on the radio, and learn about the lost world of midcentury America. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland School of Public Policy and writes on urbanism, place, and popular and cultural history. December 20, pm Addison Del Mastro. Older Posts. We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website.



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